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HomenewsKenyan Woman In Wheelchair Accuses British Army Soldiers of Hitting Her With...

Kenyan Woman In Wheelchair Accuses British Army Soldiers of Hitting Her With Truck

Kenyan woman
Kenyan woman Chaula Memusi is in a wheelchair after allegedly being injured by a British army. Photo: BBC.

A Kenyan woman is accusing British Army personnel of injuring her after a hit-and-run incident.

Chaula Memusi is in a wheelchair after allegedly being injured by a British army truck in a hit-and-run incident in January 2019.

According to the BBC, Memusi Lochede testified that British officials promised to look after her 22-year-old daughter after the incident.

“They sent a representative to tell me that they don’t want a court case and that they would take care of my daughter,” the mother said.

The mother said the British Army paid for her daughter’s hospital bills for two years.

But later they failed to pay compensation as promised.

A witness who saw the Army truck hitting Chaula said he was shocked to see the vehicle drive away after hitting the young woman.

“It was a Batuk truck, I tried to stop it but it kept moving,”

“It was a tragic scene, blood all over, her bones were crushed… people were afraid to touch her,” he said.

The witness said he struggled to lift her into his pick-up and drive her to the hospital.

British Army Training Unit Kenya (BATUK) is a permanent training support unit based mainly in Nanyuki, 200 km north of Nairobi.

It also has a small group of soldiers in Nairobi.

BATUK provides demanding training to exercising units preparing to deploy on operations or assume high-readiness tasks.

It consists of around 100 permanent staff and reinforces a short tour cohort of another 280 personnel.

Under an agreement with the Kenyan Government, up to six infantry battalions per year carry out eight-week exercises in Kenya.